Sharm El Sheikh Water Sports
Banana boat, pedalo, Kayaking, Parasailing, Water skiing, Windsurfing

Recreational water sports

There are a large number of sports that involve water such as windsurfing or waterskiing, parasailing and tubing. Some are called surface, for example windsurfing is a typical surface water sport, while others can be in the water, on the water or near the water activities. Water sports & water activities are fun and recreational for any person, it’s time for refreshing his or her body and mind. So, do not miss the chance to try some of them while holidaying in Sharm el Sheikh.

Here are the most popular water sports and activities in Sharm el Sheikh that are available any day at the most beaches:

Banana boat

Banana boat is also known as a water sled and often referred to simply as a banana, is an inflatable recreational boat meant for towing. It was invented by Glenn Matthews in the late 1980s. Different models usually accommodate three to ten riders sitting on a larger, main tube and resting their feet on two laterally flanking tubes which stabilize the boat. The main tube is often yellow and banana-shaped. Some models have two main tubes. During the ride, the driver of the powered boat attempts to flip the banana boat upside-down by doing sharp turns. Riders should always wear life jackets for safety reasons.

Riding in a banana boat is considered to be a safer activity than water-skiing or other towed-water sports, and is similar to tubing. It is generally safe to ride at 4+ years.

A pedalo

Tube boat ride or Tubing is also known as biscuiting. It’s where a large circular rubber tube is towed behind a boat at fast speeds. Generally considered a novice or child's water-sport due to the lack of skill involved. The general aim is to hold on as long as possible without falling off due to the boat's sharp turns. More experienced biscuiters also try to jump the boat's wake and become airborne. Also a very simple and novice trick for beginners would be the barrel roll, once the tube is on the outeredge of a corner going faster than normal, a rider can intentionally roll off the tube to try and roll from upright to upside down and back again all in the same motion. A pedalo (British English) or paddle boat (US, Canadian, and Australian English) is a small human-powered watercraft that a person drives by pedaling, which turns a paddle wheel. The paddle wheel of a pedalo is a smaller version of that of the paddle steamer. A two-seat pedalo has two sets of pedals, side by side, designed to be used together. Some models have three pedals on each side to allow a person to pedal from the center when boating alone. Pedalos are suited to calm waters, such as in ponds and small lakes.

Kayaking

Kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double blade paddle. The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. Their cockpit is sometimes covered by a spraydeck (or "skirt") that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray and makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers, to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler. Man sitting with legs covered in boat that tapers to a point at each end holding long, pointed, wooden pole Inuit seal hunter in a kayak, armed with a harpoon. Some modern boats vary considerably from a traditional design but still claim the title 'kayak', for instance in eliminating the cockpit by seating the paddler on top of the boat ("sit-on-top" kayaks); having inflated air chambers surrounding the boat; replacing the single hull by twin hulls ("W" kayak), and replacing paddles with other human powered propulsion methods, such as foot-powered rotational propellers and 'flippers". Kayaks are also being sailed, as well as propelled by means of small electric motors, and even by outboard gas engines, when possible. The kayak was first made and used by the native Ainu, Aleut and Eskimo hunters in sub-Arctic regions of northeastern Asia, North America and Greenland.

Parasailing

Parasailing is known as parascending, or "parakiting" is a recreational kiting activity where a person is towed behind a vehicle (usually a boat) while attached to a specially designed canopy wing that reminds one of a parachute, known as a parasail wing. The manned kite's moving anchor may be a car, truck, or boat. The harness attaches the pilot to the parasail, which is connected to the boat, or land vehicle, by the tow rope. The vehicle then drives off, carrying the parascender (or wing) and person into the air. If the boat is powerful enough, two or three people can parasail behind it at the same time. The parascender has little or no control over the parachute. The activity is primarily a fun ride, not to be confused with the sport of paragliding.

Para-sailing became a very popular activity in Sharm-el-Sheikh. In reality it is a gentle ride in the sky that gives you access to unforgettable aerial views over Sharm-el-Sheikh and provides you with the most amazing experience of flying through the air parachute attached, all without the extremities of throwing yourself from a plane and enormous heights. It is a very attractive activity to those interested in extreme sports.

Water skiing

Water skiing is a sport/game and recreational activity and is popular in many countries around the world where appropriate conditions exist - an expanse of water unaffected by wave motion. Rivers, lakes, and sheltered bays are all popular for water skiing. In this kind of water sport an individual is pulled behind a boat or a cable ski installation over a body of water, skimming the surface. The sport requires exceptional upper and lower body strength, as well as good balance and muscular endurance. Standard water skis were originally made of wood but now are usually constructed out of fibreglass-based composites. They are of similar length to downhill snow skis but are somewhat wider. Instead of a rigid binding, they have rubber molded binding, in which the skier's feet are placed. Skiers are pulled along by a rope with a handle fitted at one end and attached to a powerboat at the other.

Windsurfing

Windsurfing is a surface water sport that combines elements of surfing and sailing. This sport involves travel over water on a small 2-4.7 metre board powered by wind acting on a single sail. The sail is connected to the board by a flexible joint. The sport is a hybrid between sailing and surfing. The sail board might be considered the most minimalistic version of the modern sailboat, with the major exception that steering is accomplished by the rider tilting the mast and sail or, when planning, carving the board, rather than with a rudder.

Windsurfing can be said to straddle both the laid-back culture of surf sports and the more rules-based environment of sailing. Although it might be considered a minimalistic version of a sailboat, a windsurfer offers experiences that are outside the scope of any other sailing craft design. Windsurfers can perform jumps, inverted loops, spinning maneuvers, and other "freestyle" moves that cannot be matched by any sailboat. The boom of the 1980s led windsurfing to be recognized as an Olympic sport in 1984. However, windsurfing's popularity saw a sharp decline in the mid-1990s, however, starting in the 2000s, large numbers of avid windsurfers started giving up the sport and switching to the sport of Kitesurfing. In Egypt the best place to experience windsurfing is Dahab lagoon and Ras Sedr.


Published: 2018-12-14
Last update: 2018-12-18